Entries Tagged as 'Production'

LIBATIONS!

No good evening out is complete without a quality beverage and the rep productions of Messenger No. 4 and the 21 Would-Be Lives of Phineas Hamm featured a partnership with Austin’s own Deep Eddy Vodka to ensure we wouldn’t be lacking.

Those who braved a full night at the Blue Theatre (for both shows) received a complimentary cocktail (or soft drink) and you could also purchase them at the bar.

We had drinks concocted for us (one per show) by long time friends of Cambiare Productions Simon Ogden (The Next Stage, and Veneto in Victoria, BC) and Tony Adams (AD of Halcyon Theatre in Chicago).

Simon Ogden designed what we called the Juicy Apollo for Messenger No. 4:

The Juicy Apollo
2 oz Deep Eddy vodka
2 oz fresh squeezed lemon juice
2 oz Lillet
(white is preferred but red is also tasty and striking in the glass)
2 oz Crème de Cacao (white)
1 oz pasteurized egg white

Throw it all in a shaker with a lot of ice and shake like hell. There is almost nothing to cut the alcohol in this. YOU NEED TO SHAKE IT WITH ICE. I spent three weeks with this drink. Trust me on this. It is tart and a little dry but the Crème de Cacao rounds it off on the tongue and with the frothed egg white really does resemble Simon’s promised lemon meringue.

DeepEddyTending

Tony designed the drink for the 21 Would-Be Lives of Phineas Hamm with director and playwrights dubbed “Phin’s Cup”.

Phin’s Cup
2 Oz Deep Eddy Sweet Tea Vodka
2 Oz Peach Nectar (Kerns or Jumex)
2 Oz Lemonade (we used Simply Lemonade)
Soda Water
Grenadine

This drink is dangerous. I say this with my show closed and no further relationship with Deep Eddy – the Sweet Tea vodka is smooth and tastes almost nothing like alcohol.

Build this in a tumbler, fill it with ice and then add the nectar, lemonade and vodka, fill the glass with soda water (and then drizzle a float of grenadine. Give it a little baby stir and keep reminding yourself that there’s alcohol in the drink or not reminding your wife that there’s alcohol (Hi Megan!)

Also, as you can see, I mixed pitchers of the drink to keep lines moving. A can of peach nectar is just under 12 ounces, so a can of nectar, 12 ounces of lemonade, and 12 ounces of vodka is one half pitcher. Then add the soda and grenadine on a per glass basis. DO NOT DRINK IT STRAIGHT. F’reals. These are sipping drinks not shots.


Thank you so much to our partners in this lil concession adventure. People enjoyed having a delicious adult beverage available to them, and in most cases something they wouldn’t have tried anywhere but at our event. Thank you to Simon, Tony and especially to James at Deep Eddy Vodka for making this perk possible.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Philip Olson

Name: Philip Olson

Where are you from originally?
I was born in Pasadena California, just down the street from the famous Hollywood Graveyard (where Michael Jackson lives). I spent much of my youth living in the deserts of Albuquerque, NM

How long have you been in Austin?
15 years, I moved here before all the cedars turned into strip malls.

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
I play Messenger No. 15, best friend to Messenger No. 4. I work in tech support, and don’t really enjoy my cubicle life. I make it a personal mission to keep No. 4 out of trouble, no matter the cost.

I also get to play a love-struck Demetrius from Midsummer, Apollo god of the Sun, and Menalaeus king of Sparta !

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
My very first play was Crazy for You by Ira Gershwin. I was seventeen, and it was my junior year of high school. I was actually to scared to audition for a large part, but I ended up reading for one anyway by sort of a fluke. After going from a shy, introverted artist to being in the spotlight, I was hooked. Most of my peers had been acting their whole lives, so it took some time for me to catch up.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
Ok, this is going to sound really weird but…

I was in a play in college called Slaughter City. It’s about workers in a pork processing plant. Very gritty, dark, and rough. My character was unable to connect to people in a real way, and he had a vivid imagination. He has a crush on a woman twice his age, so he re-enacts a seduction scene… with a pig carcass. There was this big rock-musical number when it came down from the ceiling on a hydraulic hook, and that number/scene was the craziest/coolest moment I’ve ever experienced on a stage.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
A musical I was in two years ago based on the Odyssey by Homer. It was such an  embarrassing mess, and everybody that came and saw me was too embarrassed to even talk to me about it. It was boring, corny, too long, and with unending rock ballad after rock ballad. I played the son of Odysseyus, and I spent the whole play trying to kick these drunk suitors out of the house. I ultimately have a power ballad, and kill them all. ‘Nuff said.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
The amazing ensemble work, and how dynamic every single actor is. It’s great to have the set and the props have a life of their own, and I love watching that. Chorus work can be drudgery… or the best part of the show. I hope that Messenger No. 4 will really surprise and excite audience members with its group work.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Karina Domiguez

Name: Karina Dominguez

Where are you from originally?
El Paso by way of southern Arizona by way of northern Mexico.

How long have you been in Austin?
Since 1997, with a 1 1/2 year stint on the west coast after college.

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Receptionist, Klytemnaistra, Medea, Lady M.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
I was in the Christmas Pageant for my Kindergarten.
I got to play a sugar plum fairy. I remember being so excited to wear a tutu and makeup. I didn’t have ballet slippers, but my mom bought me a beautiful pair of plum colored flats to wear on the day of the show. We didn’t really rehearse the dance sequence prior to the show and then my nerves took over and so when I supposed to move right, I moved left instead and stepped on my scene partners foot.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
I played the Hawaiian volcano goddess Pele in a musical at the Vortex a few years ago. I got a dance solo while surrounded by some really good looking merpeople.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
Messing up a scene in a Greek tragedy that nearly derailed the play.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
Tan tan taaaaaaaaan!

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Jessica Allen

Name: Jessica Allen

Where are you from originally?
Devine, TX
It’s a town consisting of 4,000 people south of San Antonio, and yes, the name says it all.

How long have you been in Austin?
I actually live in San Marcos, and have been there for almost 10 years.

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Helena from Midsummer, Dionysus, and if course sexy security guard.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
I was 13 and it was a play called ‘This is a Test’. I was on stage maybe two minutes, and still got All Star Cast!

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
Wear a giant red wig, and take my bloomers off.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
Well, I know that we learn from everything, and even the so called “bad” things are inherently good in the long run, but my senior year of high school we were disqualified in OAP at the district competition for going over time.

It was pretty devastating to my teenage heart, and I felt like it was my fault, because I was the last one on stage. But, hey I am stronger now because of it, and once in college I realized that it wasn’t really that big of a deal.
(Ed note: No. It is a big deal… I’m still not over my DQ in 93…)

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
I love the characters we have all created. The script offered so much room to play, and it has been such a fun and hilarious process.

I am excited for other people to get in on the joke 🙂

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Rachel Wiese

Name: Rachel Wiese

Where are you from originally?
I’m from Arkansas. For the first 10 years of my life, I lived at the Heifer Project International learning and livestock center where volunteers from around the world came from weeks to years to help raise animals that were then shipped to third world countries as gifts that keep on giving (if you feed and water them). Then I moved from the commune to Petit Jean Mountain where my nearest neighbors were miles down the road and the nearest town was 22 miles away. SO, I went to the big city of Memphis for school- theatre and religious studies- and then it was off to New York to act and eat 3 for $1 fruit from street stands for three years. I moved to Austin for a guy.

How long have you been in Austin?
3 ½ years, I’m still with the guy.

Who are some of the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
“An unimportant Chorus Member”
(per Messenger #4, Will Hollis Snider)
(ED NOTE: She’s also Movement Choreographer, Messenger 23, Iphigenia, Shakespeare.)

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
The role of baby Jesus in a Christmas Pageant, but for real my first play was called “Myths and Men” and although I really wanted to play Persephone because she had a pretty costume, I was cast as the Narrator because of my uncanny ability at a very young age to memorize lots of words regardless of comprehending them. My first line in the play was “This is where the sky gods live, they rule earth from here”. My voice was really high pitched and I was nicknamed Betty Boop from my fifth grade stage debut through graduation. The skill has served me well when I apply it- I once got out of a New Testament final in college by memorizing and publicly reciting 1st and 2nd Timothy.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
Fly.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
Well, it was sort of off-stage. I had a big fight with another actor in a high school production of “How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying”, and I put ABC gum in the sandwich he had to eat on stage. It was my ABC gum… I’m not really proud of that, I guess he could of choked or something.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
The story is really clever and a lot of fun. I’m looking forward to telling it with this amazing ensemble.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae –Joey Melcher

Name: Joey Melcher

victoria joey-3

Where are you from originally?
Houston, TX

How long have you been in Austin? 1 year

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Rogue Messenger, Orestes, Past Messenger No.4

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
The Castaways. I played a homeless, singing child.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
While doing a children’s show in Houston, I accidentally picked a scab on my face. Classy, right? Well, the combo of sweat and blood streaming down my face and staining my clothes was pretty fun… What? Not the answer you’re looking for?

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
While playing Cyrano in college, a crew member spilled spirit gum on my hands while reapplying to my prosthetic nose in between Acts. This made it extremely difficult to give Christian the letter Cyrano wrote to Roxanne.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
A dude who would never play Romeo playing Romeo.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Vanessa Marroquin

Name: Vanessa Renae Marroquin

Vanessa

Where are you from originally?
Oh, just the best place in Texas to eat incredible Mexican Food, and it’s only 20 minutes north of the border!  McAllen, Texas.

How long have you been in Austin?
Technically I haven’t “been in” Austin, since I live in San Marcos right now, but I have lived in the central Texas area for about two years now and I absolutely love it.

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Well, I am playing some various Narrative Inc. employees, an elevator panel, trees, a fire alarm, and the like. Oh! And Chrysothemis, of course. She’s my favorite.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
It was a Christmas play my elementary school put on about an elf who became an Elvis Impersonator and was shunned from the rest of the elfish clan until Santa taught them the importance of following one’s dreams, no matter how weird they may be. I was Elf Number 3. It would have been a stellar performance if Elf Number 2 hadn’t been poking me and making fart noises throughout the entire show.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
At fifteen, I got to be a high spirited twelve year old blind girl who ran around stage laughing insanely while having the time of her life. It was so great. Oh, and I also got to tackle people to the ground. Did I mention I was blind?

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
I would say the time I sang Stacie Orrico’s “More to Life” in my middle school talent show while wearing a pink newsboy hat and silver leather jacket; or the time I played King Herrod in my church’s Christmas play where I was forced to sing like a man and “tap dance”, but then I wouldn’t be the person I am today, so I won’t.  I know.  I’m so cliché.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
The original concept. When I first read the script, I was so intrigued and fell in love with the story. It was one I had never really read before, and it is just so exciting. I think when the audience watches it, they will know they are seeing something very special and unique from the very start.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Camille Latour

Name:
Camille Latour

Where are you from originally?
I was born in a beautiful house here in Austin.  I’ve been a Southie pretty much my whole life.

How long have you been in Austin? 
I have been back for 5 years.  I got my (undergrad) liberal arts degree from Bennington College, VT, and Masters of Education from Loyola College, MD.

I have lived in Los Angeles, and have also enjoyed performing in San Francisco, New York, and Milan as well as Austin, Bastrop, Georgetown, and Lockhart.

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
I’m psyched to be playing the mighty (and saucy) Goddess Artemis, as well as Aeschylus (the slightly curmudgeony father of Greek Tragedy – quite a claim, right?)  I also have an action-packed line of Gertrude’s from Hamlet that I totally love!!!  (:  Mainly, I am delighted to get to work collaboratively as a member of the Ensemble.  Those gals are a very talented riot.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
I think the first show I was ever inspired by (I was a child in the audience) was an Epic production of Winnie the Pooh – maybe at the Hyde Park Theater.  I marveled at the other children dressed up as woodland creatures coming through the aisles – it was an exciting magic that I knew I wanted to be part of.

In 2nd grade, I played Gertrude in Hamlet (quite an ambitious choice for 7 yr olds, no?!)  But I remember feeling jipped b/c I lost the coin toss over getting to play Ophelia.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
That is a tie between 2 experiences: In 4th grade I played Hermes and ran around in a sheet stealing sheep and stuff. (Now I just run around stealing valuables and sometimes the odd piece of luggage…)

Later, in 5th grade I went on to play “Kat” in an original adaptation we did of “Taming of the Shrew”.  I don’t remember much from that play, but I loved it.  Partly because my mom let me spray my hair but mostly because I got to slap somebody.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
Once in a summer musical in Vermont I was playing a partygoer, and the fellow playing the male lead actually whispered to me on stage (during a performance) “Don’t you dare upstage me!”

…so then I had to.  (;

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
I love that I get to play.

That I get to do what I love with other brave folks who make it fun.

Plus, I’m really looking forward to kicking M4 out of my bar, yelling at him as Artemis, and messing up Apollo’s hair.

Thanks for asking.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Andrew Rodgers

Name: Andrew Aleri Rodgers

Where are you from originally?
I was born in Colorado Springs, but quickly emigrated (not of my own accord, I was two) northward to Loveland, Colorado.  The Sweetheart City (seriously, check out their valentines re-mailing program) was my hometown for most of my formative years.  I then matriculated at the Ira Brind School of Theatre Arts at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia (or IBSOTA for the acronymically-inclined), where, among other ambitions, I developed a serious love for Stage Combat.  I joined the ranks of the Society of American Fight Directors, and quickly attained the rank of Advanced Actor-Combatant.  But that has nothing to do with the question.

How long have you been in Austin?
I moved to Austin in the early summer of 2010, right after I received my Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree from the abovementioned University.  Since then I’ve visited a couple of lovely coffee shops, had my car towed, and even visited a lake/river.  I was an assistant manager at the House of Torment, where I had the distinction of making Jessica Alba scream and jump a couple feet into the air.  I also managed to make a reporter from FOX News just about pee herself.  Good Times.

I also remember bats.  Oh yeah, and I worked with a couple of fantastic people, and even got to choreograph some violence for Titus Andronicus with the Last Act Theater Company.  My choreography got me a lot of attention, a nod from the Austin Chronicle, and I even won an award from RAW: Natural Born Artists (Austin Chapter) for Performing Artist of the Year.  There was acting there too. (Ed. Note: Even some on his part)

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Really just the one.  You know… Messenger No. 4.  You know, THAT one.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
When I was three years old, my aunt Emily directed  Charlotte’s Web for Bill Reed Middle School in Loveland.

Apparently even then, students weren’t volunteering for embarrassing roles, so my aunt bribed me and my siblings with candy bars to be ducklings.  We got into the fuzzy yellow suits, complete with bills, and walked across the stage, flapping our wings, saying “Quack Quack!”  We brought down the house with laughter.  Side note- That night I shared the stage with now-famous actor Kyle Howard, who you may have seen in such movies as House Arrest, The Paper Brigade, and the recent TV show My Boys.  It’s not relevant in the least, but it’s interesting.
Kinda.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage?
Tough Call.  I think the most exciting this I’ve ever gotten to do is celebrate Christmas as a zombie.  My senior year of college, my school partnered with award-winning theatrical think-tank New Paradise Laboratories for the show MORT.  It was a three-part devised piece centering around death and the afterlife.  It was loosely based around Dante’s Inferno, and the third part was the inferno.  We made it into a zombie wasteland where we were celebrating Christmas, complete with presents, Santa Hanging by a noose, and even a zombie Ballet.  The audience was arranged in and around the playing space, so at any point, there was a zombie two or three feet from any given audience member.   We ran full speed around and in between audience members, brushing their hair, blowing on them, reenacting our deaths, and horrifying them with pictures of ourselves when we were children.  we made people weep, we made them scream, and we made them laugh.  I even got to threaten someone whose cell phone went off. There’s nothing like an angry zombie to make one turn one’s cell phone to vibrate.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
Upon a Midnight Dreary, October 2010.  It was a great re-imagining of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart, with two fantastic actors (Karen Alvarado and Travis Bedard).  I choreographed the violence, and it was my first show in Austin.  We got great press, but we were forced to use some sub-standard props.  In the script, the main character has a gun go off right by her ear, and is deafened while her husband is shot.  We were using a two-dollar cap gun that I purchased at HEB.  It didn’t matter how many times I addressed and tested the cap gun, it was notoriously unreliable. So much so that on the second night of the show, it failed to fire despite having the trigger pulled ten times.  In front of the audience. With me cowering in fear before the gun.

Twenty agonizingly silent seconds passed before eventually, our stage manager got the hint, and brought the lights down while I screamed in “pain,” trying to cover the fact that the gun never went off. Add to that the fact that all of our sound cues were ten seconds delayed that night, and we had reviewers in the audience. It was an entirely forgettable night of theater.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?

I am beyond excited to be working with this incredible cast.  Every moment I spend with them sinks me deeper in awe with the incredible talent and creativity of these people.  For my first leading role, I could not have asked for co-stars and co-workers this amazing. Every second these people are on stage, they are committed to bringing not just entertainment, but excitement and intrigue to the audience.  When I first met the cast, I drove home in a funk, utterly depressed- I was convinced that after hearing all of us read the script, I was about to be fired from the role of M4 because there was no way I could ever keep up with these people. They were way too funny and way too clever for me to be in the same production.  But seeing all of us grow together and seeing this show develop has been an incredible experience. To say that they keep me humble and on my toes would be an understatement. They keep me so much on my toes that I keep falling over, whilst they point and laugh.  But it’s okay, because I’m laughing right along with them.  This show is amazing because of the incredible cast, no question.

Messenger No. 4 – Dramatis Personae – Daniel Sawtelle

Name: Daniel Sawtelle

Where are you from originally?
I hail from the land Welch’s Grapes, the Brig Niagara Battle of 1812 Warship, and “That Thing You Do” – Erie, PA.

How long have you been in Austin?
Since July of 2007.  You do the math.  Because I’m no good at it.
(Ed note: 4.5 years)

Who are some of the the folks you’re playing in Messenger No. 4?
Talthybios, Lysander, Euripides, and various men on film.

What was the very first show you did ever in your entire life?
The first production (and I use that term lightly) I ever did was my church’s hell house.  It was called “The Ultimate Trip”.  Tagline–“It’ll scare the HELL right out of you.”  I played the distraught teen who committed suicide.  We were pretty gruesome for Christians.  Mel Gibson had NOTHING on us.  The first actual play I ever did was “Sound of Music.”  I was Franz The Butler.  I couldn’t (and still can’t) sing.

What is the single most fun thing you’ve ever gotten to do on stage? Besides stab Joey–er Rogue Messenger?   Honestly, I’m torn.  In college I was part of an ensemble that put together an original piece called “Vain” that was based on the prophets and other stories of the Old Testament.  It was very avant-garde complete with all of the actors in black tight fitting clothing and performing on an encircled space primarily filled with packing peanuts.  One of the stories we portrayed was the story of Job.  We portrayed God and Satan as children and “Job” was God’s favorite toy, so of course it was a My Buddy doll.  As Satan, I bet God I could break him.  I then proceeded to mangle that My Buddy doll in any and every way imaginable.  I stretched him, threw him, gave him a DDT, banged his head on the metal edge of a bin we had in the center of the space filled with water.  Nothing worked!  I then screamed “Why are you still smiling????” at the doll.  Now, as a child who grew up watching WWE and who wrestled with his My Buddy doll daily, this was very nostalgic and extremely fun.

Another option may be doing comedy roasts with The Austin Roaster’s Club.  There is nothing quite as fun as hurling insults at your best friends and complete strangers and having people pay to watch.

What moment on stage do you wish you could go back and erase from history?
This one’s easy.  I was Barnette Lloyd in “Crimes of the Heart.”  Barnette only has a few scenes in the play and in this production they had been staged very similarly.  During a performance, I either began the first scene with lines from the second or the second scene with lines from the first.  Either way, I was thrown and suddenly drowning on stage gasping to find my spot, my lines, anything that would end this humiliation.  It was the only time I’ve ever completely blanked on stage.  The scene was right before intermission and as I exited stage and the house lights came up, I heard an audience member say “That’s why I could never be an actor.”

Also, it was the only performance I had people in the audience.
Including my brand new girlfriend.
We broke up shortly thereafter.

What about Messenger No. 4 are you most excited to be sharing with an audience?
So many things.  Doll-wrestling aside, I’ve never gotten to be in a really good stage fight.  I’ve been killed, sure, but never had that long sustained sword fight.  I’m very excited about that.  Also, Will has come up with a very clever idea here, and the cast has been able to bring it to life in a very fun and creative way.  There are an incredible amount of references, jokes, parodies and dramatic moments thrown in to this show and they come at you at break-neck speed, sometimes from out of nowhere.  It’s fantastic to be a part of this process and I can’t wait to see the reaction of the audience, to see who gets what joke or reference, and who tears up to some random scene from a Greek play they may have never heard of.  So in summary, I’m excited to share fighting and the overall EXPERIENCE that is Messenger No. 4